April 20, 2019

Americans ready for long election night

Americans are getting set for a long election night on Tuesday 8/11/16) of waiting to see who the 45th US president will be between the front-runners; Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump.

 

According to AFP, the Democrat and the Republican campaigned into the wee hours of polling day as they fought to sell their agenda for the future of the world’s greatest power.

 

The 69-year old former first lady, senator and secretary of state — backed by A-list musical stars and incumbent President Barack Obama — urged the country to unite and vote for “a hopeful, inclusive, big-hearted America.”

 

Trump, meanwhile, doubled down on his outreach to voters who feel left behind by globalization and social change, finishing with a flourish on his protectionist slogan: “America first.”

 

“Just imagine what our country could accomplish if we started working together as one people, under one God, saluting one American flag,” the 70-year-old billionaire reality television star told cheering supporters.

 

According to reports, some 40 million citizens have already cast their votes in states that allow early voting.

 

Various opinion polls indicated Clinton was ahead, as the tiny hamlet of Dixville Notch in New Hampshire opened Election Day balloting.

 

A polling average by tracker site RealClearPolitics gave Clinton a 3.3 percentage point national lead, but Trump is closer or even has the advantage in several of the swing states that he must conquer to smash Clinton.

 

 

This comes amid claims by Trump that a “corrupt Washington and media elite” is seeking to rig the race

 

The controversial tycoon said last month that he may not concede defeat if he thinks voting is unfair.

 

Clinton has remained calm, despite a shake-up in the final weeks of her campaign when the FBI reopened an investigation into whether she had put US secrets at risk by using a private email server — only to close it again on Sunday.

 

The election of President and Vice President of the United States is, technically, an indirect election in which citizens of the United States who are registered to vote in one of the fifty states or Washington, D.C. cast ballots for members of the U.S.

 

The Electoral College, known as electors then in turn cast direct votes, known as electoral votes, in their respective state capitals for President and Vice President.

 

Each of the states casts as many electoral votes as the total number of Senators and House Representatives in Congress, while Washington, D.C. is represented by the same number of votes as the lowest-represented state.

 

In modern times, almost all electors are pledged to vote for a particular presidential candidate, thus the results of the election can generally be determined based on the state-by-state popular vote.

 

The candidate who receives an absolute majority of electoral votes for President or Vice President is then elected to that office.

 

If no candidate receives an absolute majority for President, the House of Representatives chooses the President; if no candidate receives a majority for Vice President, then the Senate chooses the Vice President.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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